“Shaming…” is, itself, repulsive.

18 Nov

But I knew it’d come to this.

This article on dealing with male sexual abuse, How to Stop the Predators Who Aren’t Famous, uses the word “to shame” for how to deal with sexual predators (whatever that is or, rather, whoever we choose to define as such) several times, without the slightest compunction or socio-historical apprehensions that that word should carry with it.

Our mission should be a cold, legal, detached one that will make sure that the men who committed these acts of emotional and/or physical violence to vulnerable others are brought to justice. (And women, though I remember how many were baying for Brigitte Macron’s blood when her husband first took office and it churns my stomach.)  It’s not to make a moral example of them.

The need “to shame” is as dangerous — if not more — and revolting as the behavior we would like it to stigmatize.  It’s a moralizing, slippery slope, one that has proven particularly dangerous in American history.  I know the sweet hard-on many Americans seem to experience at the public humiliation and character assassination of an individual.  Resist it.

Hester Prynne

From @hester__pynne

And see my Michael Phelps posts.

Comment: nikobakos@gmail.com

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