Tag Archives: Greeks

A deserved Greek self-pat on the back — from Ekathimerini

21 Nov
Pantelis Boukalas PANTELIS BOUKALAS

Humanity in the age of neo-cynicism

What keeps societies from falling apart is their members’ spontaneous and unforced compliance with unwritten laws, with principles that they do not even have to be reminded of in order to adhere to.

Values such as solidarity, altruism and hospitality may be set out in charters or schoolbooks. But that is of little consequence if it is not in a person to empathize with a stranger’s suffering. And when we say empathize, we mean standing by another person with actions, and not with vacuous, cost-free words.

Greece’s social fabric could have been ripped apart a long time ago under the pressure of the (still lingering) financial crisis. It would not have been surprising if egotism and antisocial self-interest had emerged as the sole “natural” reaction to the long chain of disappointments. After all, we live in an age of a neo-cynicism that propagates the “natural” and “unavoidable” character of social inequalities and the – also natural – character of offshore tax avoidance.

And yet, despite the difficulties, the unemployment, the underemployment, the falling wages and the devastating overtaxation, the crudeness of individualism has not managed to defeat our culture of solidarity. Its sirens failed to lure the many. The ordinary people. Those who keep a society glued together.

This failure became evident in the attitude of the majority toward the migrants and refugees. Sure, there were cases of bigotry, exploitation, even crude racism. How can one forget the xenophobic sermons from the lips of priests, those otherwise preachers of Christian love? But such behavior never became mainstream.

Altruism was also on display (in the same humble fashion) in the wake of the disastrous summer wildfires. And it is now again evident following the deadly flash floods in Mandra and Nea Peramos, on the western outskirts of Athens. Ordinary people have been offering help from their dwindling savings.

Help, in the form of manual labor (which is all they have to give), has also come from migrants and refugees. The Pakistanis and the Syrians who rushed to provide assistance in flood-stricken Mandra are also part of our society.

Similarly, we cannot deny the fact that the leadership of Golden Dawn, who organized a Greeks-only handout, despite their Christian pretensions, are also part of the same society. One had to wonder if the Arvanite Greeks (Christian Albanians who migrated to Greece in the Middle Ages) who live in the area were entitled to aid coming from the members of the country’s neo-fascist party.

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Mapping the Greek diaspora

17 Nov

 

Greek diaspora.jpg

Mapping the Greek diaspora from Ekathimerini — YANNIS PALAIOLOGOS

We’re definitely blue-staters, no surprise.  Wish I knew what the different colors mean.  Cluster of orange tacks around New York metropolitan area and southern New England suggest a higher percentage of recent arrivals?

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For The Byzantine Ambassador @byzantinepower (interesting thread going on there)

8 Nov

A great book — and destined to be the seminal go-to for these issues — for anybody interested in role Hellenism played in later Greek consciousness is Kaldellis’ Hellenism in Byzantium: The Transformations of Greek Identity and the Reception of the Classical Tradition:

Kaldellis

It leaves you with more questions than answers, but that’s probably how it should be.

Comment: nikobakos@gmail.com

From Ekathimerini: Home of Afghan pupil attacked with stones and — kathikia?

3 Nov

Καθίκια…  He probably got better grades than your kid; was that the problem?  Several statistical sources find children of immigrants in Greece outperform children of natives on both secondary and university levels.

amir1-thumb-large

Unknown assailants have attacked the home of the family of the 11-year-old Afghan boy who had not been allowed by his school in the Athens suburb of Dafni to carry the Greek flag during the October 28 parade.

According to police, the assailants threw stones at the boy’s home at dawn on Friday

Amir, a refugee and a fifth-year primary school pupil, had been selected to carry the Greek flag during the parade to commemorate the 1940 anniversary of Greece’s refusal to ally with the Axis powers in World War II, known as “Ochi Day.”

He was picked by lot under new rules introduced by the leftist-led government earlier this year that scrapped selection on the basis of academic performance

However, he was not allowed to carry the flag and eventually paraded holding the school’s sign.

Earlier story: Probe as refugee pupil denied flag role

God knows what else this kid has been through.  Who deserves to have this memory, as innocuous as it might seem, seared into their minds?

Two people before have asked me what “kathiki” (kαθίκι) means in Greek when I used it in some other post.

I think it literally means “potty” — like “Shit already or get off the…”  Except in Greek it’s an insult without any of the cute childlike or Victorian connotations of potty.  “Scumbag” is the closest English term I can think of, in terms of power it packs as an insult and with similar hues of both indifferent cruelty and absolute moral vapidity.

Now you know — for when it turns up next.

Comment: nikobakos@gmail.com

Watch! Varoufakis discusses latest book on Greek crisis: “The Adults in the Room”

3 Nov

Succinct, summarizing conversation, Varoufakis discusses his most recent book, The Adults in the Room: https://www.pscp.tv/w/1yoJMMnkkoRJQ

Adults in the Room

Yanis-Varoufakis-920071

 

Catalonia: I find these photos GENUINELY TERRIFYING — “¡Basta ya con Cataluña!”

31 Oct

Supporters of Catalan independence outside the Catalan parliament in Barcelona during a speech by Premier Carles Puigdemont on whether he would declare independence from Spain, October 10, 2017

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Catalan nationalist

These are photos of a jubilance that one imagines accompanied the Emancipation Proclamation or sees in images of the Liberation of Paris or of the Greek flag being raised over the Acropolis in 1944 or of V-J Day or the Fall of the Berlin Wall.

Instead, they’re photos of a sociopathic hysteria: of a people with one of the highest living standards in the world, with their language and culture (a word I’ve come to hate) fully un-threatened, living in a region with the absolutely highest level of autonomy than perhaps any region of any other state in Europe, or even the world, cumming in the streets because of an absolutely meaningless independence they think they’ve won in an increasingly interdependent world.  Meanwhile their “leaders” are having their moules frites in Brussels.

Really, they scare me.  The affect is so off, the affect level so incommensurate to the stimulus, that it suggests the haunting spectre that even people in one of the most liberal, progressive of human societies can be convinced they’re victims of something.  And like the convert, beware the victim.

There’s a name to that spectre and the victim narrative that is now haunting not only Catalonia and Spain and Europe and American democracy, but the entire world: identity politics.  As Mark Lilla has already said — please read the piece — the main problem with identity politics is that they don’t do politics: Mark Lilla’s “The Once and Future Liberal: After Identity Politics”.  It’s nonsense.  It’s a waste of all of our time, something even more precious than our energy and our resources and brain cells.  It’s a lame Fifth Avenue parade that’s supposed to actually express the soul of a particular segment of human civilization.  It’s an adolescent acting out of culture in a Mardi Gras costume in a deadly serious arena of politics that can quickly get dangerous.  And cultures that deserve to survive, will, by definition, do so on their own and don’t need constant “Pride” parades and manifestos and events and pointless — and dangerous — referenda.  (It’s bad enough to give the demos something complicated to think about; giving them an easy yes-no question is potentially fatal to any polity.)

Andrew Sullivan did a really good job in his  “I Used to Be a Human Being” for New York magazine last year, describing how being hooked up to a screen and keyboard all our lives makes our brains oatmeal, and how blogging all the years he did for his Daily Dish started to have physical health consequences for him, physical consequences that he could only deal with through treatment of his mind and soul.

I’m not in danger of that — usually.  One, I’m too lazy.  Two, I don’t “cover” running stories like Sullivan used to do on his Dish, in what really was a border-line manic-obsessive fashion.  Rather, I jump here and there, back and forth, with now and then ruminations that are all kind of “evergreens”, to use journalist sprache.

But as the child of a family that suffered terribly as an ethnic minority under a Stalinist regime, as a member of an ethnic group that was once spread all over the eastern Mediterranean and was then locked up in the pigsty of a nation-state, as an ethnic-American who always felt the world outside his window was sort of a foreign country, I’m acutely sensitive to issues of pluralism and how they should be negotiated and they strike incredibly powerful chords in me.  And they’ve made me a defender of minority rights but an even more intense critic of self-determination.  It’s not pluralist for every two-bit tribe of Balko-somethings to have their own country; you’re destroying pluralism that way — and the “way” always involves violence of some sort.  WHICH IS WHY I STILL GET SO FREAKED OUT ABOUT YUGOSLAVIA.

That’s also why a story like Catalonia can consume me for weeks if I let it.  And this post was actually meant to declare that I will not myself be writing or quoting or even linking to anything that has to do with the issue — at least until something substantive happens — which may be tomorrow…  I still have some identity politics/multi-culti-bashing pieces knocking around inside my head, but they’ll be dealing with other parts of the world.

Because Catalonia — which infuriates me — and Spain — which I love — are two players that can completely eat me alive if I let them.  For other gold-and-red semiotics, see my Bodegas.

Comment: nikobakos@gmail.com

Bodega 10

Photo: Athens graffiti

23 Oct

“He’d leave and I’d die, he’d return and kill me.”

“Έφευγε και πέθαινα, ερχόταν και με σκότωνε.”

Έφευγε και πέθαινα..

Comment: nikobakos@gmail.com

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