Tag Archives: Erdoğan

Erdie in the Twilight Zone

25 Nov

I always hear the Twilight Zone theme in my head when Erdie or other Turkish politicians make statements like this:

Erdoğan calls Demirtaş a ‘terrorist,’ denies existence of a Kurdish problem in Turkey

Turkish Minute@TurkishMinuteTM https://turkishminute.com/2020/11/25/erdogan-calls-demirtas-a-terrorist-denies-existence-of-a-kurdish-problem-in-turkey/ Translate Tweet 3:56 PM · Nov 25, 2020·Twitter Web App

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Erdoğan, Cyprus: “Mr Erdoğan’s vulgarity has no limits.”

24 Nov

Agnes C. Poirier liked

Anastasios Antoniou@AnastasiosAA

Turkey just renamed John Kennedy Avenue in Varosha to Semih Sancar Avenue. Semih Sancar was Turkey’s chief of armed forces in 1974, when Turkey invaded Cyprus. Mr Erdogan’s vulgarity has no limits.

8:33 AM · Nov 24, 2020·Twitter for iPhone

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Next year marks the 200-year anniversary of Greece’s secession from the Ottoman Empire: here’s the first of the bicentennial kitsch

22 Nov

Fasten your seat belts; it’s gonna be a rough ride…

Too bad, because this song — Dionyses Savvopoulos’ «Ας κρατήσουν οι χοροί»/”Let the dancing continue” — is not only a nice piece, but can really be said to mark an important shift in 20th century Greek culture. In its kaleidoscope of Romeic imagery and thoughts and historical references (a super bitch to translate, but I’ll get around to it, promise) the song is kind of a hip anthem to Greek roots, and a loud negation of the cheap, lefty populism of the metapoliteuse, as the period after the dictatorship of 1967-74 is known. Part of what characterized those years of new freedom was a throw-the-baby-out-with-the-bathwater rejection of anything that smacked of heritage or roots or the past of Greek civilization, and this song appeared just around the time when Greeks’ attitudes started to shift toward a healthier balance, which since the “crisis” has, in fact, started to swing in the completely other direction, as Greeks look for solace in tradition as a way of dealing with the wild social and economic buffeting of the past decade or so. When I post the translation, folks will understand a little better what I’m trying to say.

But the video is hopelessly silly, despite the touching array of beautiful Roman faces. The initial stadium part is ok, but then there’s the big daoulia sequence that looks like it could be part of an Erdoğan rally, and the flashing projection of Revolutionary war heroes, and… And if any of you remember the pageant of cringe-worthy “Hellenic” tackiness that the 2004 Olympic games brought us, be ready for the same deluded, patriotic bourdes squared, στο τετράγωνο.

Hopefully, we’ll at least get a few laughs out of all of it.

Here’s Savvopoulos’ original, by the way, which I just listened to and it made me tear up a little:

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Who started this fashion of balding, paunchy, late middle-aged political leaders playing with military dress?

20 Nov

There’s something Village People-ish about it, at best; Commodus, Roman-decadent at worst…

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Photo: Enes Kanter is a class act: “Thank you for supporting innocent people in Turkey…”

14 Nov

Photos: Armenians, when does it end?

12 Nov

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We’ll always have Sicily II, the Cathedral of Monreale — “the art of our ancestors safe from the plaster, whitewash, eye-gouging — and drapes — of the hysterics and puritans of monotheism…”

22 Sep

The Cathedral of Monreale (See also: We’ll always have Sicily I: the church of the Martorana in Palermo and We’ll always have Sicily III: the Cathedral of Cefalù)

And, of course, as per millenial-cum-major-victim, Ayesha Siddiqui

“…unless you’ve had 90% of your cultural and artistic heritage — the product of what was one of the main poles of human civilization for two millenia — destroyed and lost, with the remnants still being vigorously vandalized today, in 2020 AD, “I don’t think I can really be that close to you.”

We’ll always have Sicily I: the church of the Martorana in Palermo — the art of our ancestors safe from the plaster, whitewash, eye-gouging — and drapes — of the hysterics and puritans of monotheism…

21 Sep
Church of the Martorana12th century

(See also We’ll always have Sicily II, the Cathedral of Monreale and We’ll always have Sicily III: the Cathedral of Cefalù)

The Normans weren’t exactly our best friends once they embarked on their conquests and rise to power in the Mediterranean. But when they had settled in, they started developing certain Mediterranean civilized habits that almost no one who comes to this part of the world is immune to.

For example, when they wanted something beautiful built and decorated they knew where to place the want ad: either C-Town or among the Greeks who already inhabited Sicily and parts of the Italian south. And, after the Normans, the Angevins, Aragonese, Bourbons, Piemontesi, and, finally, the republic of Italy, kept it all safe.

Mostly people think Ravenna when they think of things Byzantine in Italy. But no part of Italy is as laden with high Byzantine beauty as Sicily is. And the church of the Martorana may be the single most important site for in situ Byzantine art in the world. Read about it. It’s really fascinating. Not least for “belonging” to the Albanian-Italian community of Sicily:

The church is a Co-cathedral to the Eparchy of Piana degli Albanesi[1] of the Italo-Albanian Catholic Church, a diocese which includes the Italo-Albanian (Arbëreshë) communities in Sicily who officiate the liturgy according to the Byzantine Rite in the ancient Greek language and Albanian language[2] The Church bears witness to the Eastern religious and artistic culture still present in Italy today, further contributed to by the Albanian exiles who took refuge in southern Italy and Sicily from the 15th century under the pressure of TurkishOttoman persecutions in Albania and the Balkans.

[Otherwise, of course, “there is no compulsion in religion.” me, NB, my emphasis above as well]

Here are some photos I put together:

And, of course, as per my chum Ayesha Siddiqui, unless you’ve had 90% of your cultural and artistic heritage — the product of what was one of the main poles of human civilization for two millenia — destroyed and lost, with the remnants still being vigorously vandalized today, in 2020 AD, “I don’t think I can really be that close to you.”

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Turkey is outgunned in the eastern Mediterranean: I can’t believe that things have gotten to a point where I’m posting charts like this

13 Sep

Bre haydi git… : If I were from Kasımpaşa, I would hate a young, worldly, educated, eloquent, well-dressed, visionary, cute Frenchman too — especially with that tan he was sporting in Corsica.

12 Sep

P.S. But I’m not; I’m from Corona!

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