From Alex Shams @seyyedreza “…after homes of some members of Alevi religious minority community marked on anniversary of a 1970s pogrom”

24 Nov

Screen Shot 2017-11-24 at 5.04.42 PM

Below I’ve pasted a Twitter / email war I had with some AKP idiot a couple of years ago.  Long, but worth it, and/or at least see video at the end:

The Turkish Islamist’s frightening animus toward Alevis

19 Sep

Teomete” , a dude with whom I had a Twitter fight a few years ago over Turkish Alevis and Syrian Alawites, happily climbs out of the drainage pipe to show his true AK-fanatic’s colors (please check out his Twitter page with Erdoğan portrayed as a Cross-bearing, flogged and martyred Jesus Christ).  In response to my take on the AL Monitor’s piece Why are Turks flocking to Greece? he cheers us up today with this:

2h2 hours ago

Replying to

:) Apiece (of shit) written by filthy sectarian pseudo Turk,Safavid Alevist shiite for a sym-sectarian Asadist shiite news portal

My Shia sympathies have been made clear pretty often, but my spiritual sympathies — buoyed by personal love-friendship experiences — for Alevism, the only genuinely hip form of Islam, are even stronger.  “Teomete” is scary, but can someone tell me what about makes him a “Safavid sectarian” for the gentleman?  Is it just his name?  Is he known as an Alevi journalist in Turkey?

Below are cut and pasted my posts with my exchange between Teo-jaan and me from 2015, where I point out that the added hatred for Alevis on Turkish Fundies’ part comes from the fact that they so often overlap with Kurdish-Zaza speakers.

Enjoy.  And if Teo-jaan responds I’ll let you know and please just follow him on your own on Twitter because I won’t be responding.  Δεν μπορώ να ασχολούμαι.  But he’s interesting, both in discussion with me and on his Twit page, for how modern he is in terms of mastery of internet language and slang, or in the photo of his puppy (doesn’t he know keeping dogs as pets is haram?) and what a reactionary, nationalist, neo-pious creep he still is in all his ideas and everything else.  Social media changes nothing, liberates nothing, problematizes nothing; it just gives you a bullhorn.

**************************************************************************************

Syrian Alawites and Turkish Alevis closer than I thought

5 Aug

From The New York Times:As Syrian War Roils, Sectarian Unrest Seeps Into Turkey”

As Syria’s civil war degenerates into a bloody sectarian showdown between the government’s Alawite-dominated troops and the Sunni Muslim majority, tensions are increasing across the border between Turkey’s Alawite minority and the Sunni Muslim majority here.

Many Turkish Alawites, estimated at 15 million to 20 million strong and one of the biggest minorities in this country, seem to be solidly behind Syria’s embattled strongman, Bashar al-Assad, while Turkey’s government, and many Sunnis, supports the Syrian rebels.

The Alawites fear the sectarian violence spilling across the border. Already, the sweltering, teeming refugee camps along the frontier are fast becoming caldrons of anti-Alawite feelings.

“If any come here, we’re going to kill them,” said Mehmed Aziz, 28, a Syrian refugee at a camp in Ceylanpinar, who drew a finger across his throat.

He and his friends are Sunnis, and they all howled in delight at the thought of exacting revenge against Alawites.

Many Alawites in Turkey, especially in eastern Turkey where Alawites tend to speak Arabic and are closely connected to Alawites in Syria, are suspicious of the bigger geopolitics, and foreign policy analysts say they may have a point. The Turkish government is led by an Islamist-rooted party that is slowly but clearly trying to bring more religion, particularly Sunni Islam, into the public sphere, eschewing decades of purposefully secular rule. Alawites here find it deeply unsettling, and a bit hypocritical, that Turkey has teamed up with Saudi Arabia, one of the most repressive countries in the world, and Qatar, a religious monarchy, both Sunni, to bring democracy to Syria.

The Alawites point to the surge of foreign jihadists streaming into Turkey, en route to fight a holy war on Syria’s battlefields. Many jihadists are fixated on turning Syria, which under the Assad family’s rule has been one of the most secular countries in the Middle East, into a pure Islamist state.

More:

The Alawites here are worried they could become easy targets. Historically, they have been viewed with suspicion across the Middle East by mainstream Muslims and often scorned as infidels. The Alawite sect was born in the ninth century and braids together religious beliefs, including reincarnation, from different faiths.

Many Alawites do not ever go to a mosque; they tend to worship at home or in Alawite temples that have been denied the same state support in Turkey that Sunni mosques get. Many Alawite women do not veil their faces or even cover their heads. The towns they dominate in eastern Turkey, where young women sport tank tops and tight jeans, feel totally different than religious Sunni towns just a few hours away, where it can be difficult even to find a woman in public.

**************************************************************************************

Turkish Alevis and Syrian (or Lebanese…or Turkish?) Alawites — a Twitter exchange

13 Sep

I recently stumbled on a tweet on my account that I had somehow missed from August 2012 about an article from the Times around that time (As Syria War Roils, Unrest Among Sects Hits TurkeyAugust 4, 2012   The post — mine — was called: Syrian Alawites and Turkish Alevis closer than I thought”  (August 5th, 2012 on the Jadde)

I’ll just paste the Tweet exchange all here even if it’s kind of messy-looking:

 

**************************************************************************************

Alevis and Alawites addendum: a “p.s.” from Teomete

14 Sep

“My rejection to the article of just was bcoz of their evil mind on manipulation by distorting the fact about Alevis +

It’s natural 2 call & ask editorial 2 make correction when they lied or manipulated the facts. U and yr country shld do diz too

**********************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

Yeah.  Well.  I don’t have a country, abi.  I’m the citizen of a couple.  And I’m kind of an honorary-guest-citizen of — I think, at last call — about twenty-seven others.  But they’re not mine.  And they don’t belong to me any more than I belong to them.  And I certainly wouldn’t be caught dead running around hiding the truth about any of them and calling it “lying” and “defaming” if others state that truth clearly.  And that’s one thing I honor American society and Protestant conscience and self-examination for having taught me.*  Greeks call what you do “hiding behind your finger.”  In Spanish they have the more poetic phrase: “The sun can’t be blocked with one finger.”

In this blog post of mine:Magnificent Turks’ and the origins of this blog I talk about several Greek brothers who actually think just like you, a Turk.  Imagine.  They think that if you don’t speak the historical truth that it’ll go away somehow.  They think that if you speak that truth it’s because your intent is “evil” — just like you do.  They tell you to “go fuck yourself” when you speak the truth — which you don’t do because you’re Turkish and polite, which I appreciate, and not a foul-mouthed Neo-Greek who thinks he’s oh-so-clever-and-articulate because he’s always got three or four nasty epithets ready on the tip of his tongue to hurl at you.  And they call you κομπλεξικό — that you’ve got ‘neurotic hang-ups’ to translate roughly — because you say and write things that “aid and abet the enemies of our fatherland.”  Who’s got the hang-ups there: me or someone who walks around in 2014 AD using the term “enemies of our fatherland” is up to you to decide.  But I can put you in touch with them if you like, because you all think exactly the same.

Here’s my one country:roosevelt-avenue-jackson-heights-little-india-micro-neighborhoods-nyc-untapped-cities-brennan-ortiz

Photo via Netizen. (click)

…and as you can see most people here have better things to do than be thinking about your kind of närrischkeit.

Comment: nikobakos@gmail.com

**********************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

* As an ESL teacher in New York City’s CUNY system for over ten years I frequently had the experience of my foreign students simply left perplexed that Americans were constantly rehashing and criticizing their history.  I’d read the devastating attack on American self-righteousness and paranoia that is Arthur Miller’s Crucible with my students; then we’d read his thorough moral trashing of American capitalism in Death of a Salesman.  Then show them Apocalypse Now and parts of the Burns’ documentaries, Eyes on the Prize or New York: A Documentary Film or even South Park’s Team America: World Police or the brilliant documentary about Iraq by Charles Ferguson, No End in Sight; if I were still there I would be taking them to see Twelve Years a Slave.  Till finally a Brazilian girl said to me: “I dunno, teacher…if you came to my country to study Portuguese, no one would ever tell you that anything bad ever happened in Brazilian history…” both amused and baffled at her own observation.

Checking out this post on the nationalism of little countries might add another dimension to this.

***************************************************************************************

More on Alevis and Alawites…or Alevis and Kurds…or Iraqi Kurds…or…Christian Kurds…or Assyrians…or…

27 Sep

A video interview from 2011 of a smart, cute, articulate Kurdish guy from near Maraş that’s a good primer, as it claims, on all the intricacies of the above.

Note the graphic at around 5:08: “Alevi = Alawite”.  And then the interviewer pops the million-dollar question: “So, who are you loyal to?  You’re an Alevi Kurd from Turkey.  Where do your loyalties lie?” — that kind of nails the whole issue on the head.  Because, not being the sharpest tool in the shed,  he doesn’t realize that the Kurdish guy never even gives him an answer.  Because there is none.  Because the question betrays, again, the Westerner’s incapacity to understand that multiple identities can co-exist in not just one nation or one community, but in a single individual.  And you can tell that the interviewer is getting bombarded with a complexity that he can’t even begin to make sense of — largely because he’s trying to make some sense of it in all the wrong ways.

Sad, prescient comment at the end concerning Syria: “It’s going to be a disaster.”

Comment: nikobakos@gmail.com

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: